Tag Archives: power

The Ipperwash Crisis: An Analysis

It is undeniable that the outcome of the Ipperwash crisis was none less than devastating. The death of Dudley George and the actions of the police towards the protestors as a group allows for the issue of criminalizing dissent to be brought to light, and hopefully eventually addressed at the institutional level. The Ipperwash crisis […]

science, knowledge, evidence, and the state- Critical analysis

The rallies and events that included chants of ‘death of evidence’ are significant in the understanding of power relations between the public, knowledge and the state. The protests also signify the importance of criminalization of dissent. Understanding criminalization of dissent helps us understand the deeper social, political and economic issues in our society. Studying the […]

Critical Analysis: Take Back the Night

Take Back the Night is an organization that was formed in the 1960s in response to various victim-blaming strategies used to blame women for their sexual assaults; it is also focused on addressing women’s safety at night (Take Back the Night 2014). It is presumed that women are more suitable targets than men, therefore requiring […]

Ipperwash: An Indigenous Resistance

As an important piece of Canadian and Indigenous history, the Ipperwash crisis was a fatal Indigenous land claims protest against the Canadian government in 1995 (Morden, 2013). The origins of the conflict at Ipperwash are deeply rooted in past socio-historical relations between the Canadian state and Indigenous people throughout the twentieth century (Morden, 2013, p. […]

The Burnt Church Crisis

The Burnt Church Crisis was a conflict in New Brunswick, Canada, from 1999-2002, between the Mi’kmaq community of Burnt Church and the non-Native residents of New Brunswick. The underlying cause of the dispute between the Mi’kmaq people and the non-Natives was the disagreement of fishing rights in the Miramichi Bay. The Mi’kmaq community claimed that they […]

Critical Analysis: Kingston Penitentiary Riot 1971

The Kingston Penitentiary Riot of 1971 is a significant event for understanding the criminalization of dissent. The criminalization of dissent illustrates the wider social, political and economic issues in the Canadian state. There are a number of key theoretical and conceptual frameworks relevant to the Kingston Penitentiary Riot, including power dynamics and class struggles, the […]

Women’s Suffrage: The Difference between Prosecution and Persecution

Women suffragette’s organized themselves and protested against inequality and their lack of rights for a span of decades between the late 19th century and early 20th century.  During this time in Canada, patriarchy was deeply embedded in the social, economic and political fabric of the nation and many women were ready for a change.  The […]

Can We Live with the Injustice towards Migrant Workers?

It might seem that the question is, “Can you imagine the chaos that would exist if we didn’t have laws, rules and order?” I think the real question is, “Can you live with the injustices that the law perpetuates?” In the past decade, Canada’s labour market has undergone a shift to rely on temporary labour […]

The Yonge Street Riot: Significance of Criminalization and Dissent

Through analyzing facts, depictions, and representations of the Yonge Street Riot of 1992, it is clear that there are many underlying theoretical and conceptual frameworks that can be applied to this event. To refresh our memories of this event, the Yonge Street riot was an act of dissent in response to police brutality and police […]

Quebec Students’ Strike/Movement

Students were undermined when the provincial government of Québec proposed that a tuition hike should be implemented. They wanted their voice to be heard and by working together for several months their movement ended up being a success and their efforts became noteworthy. Beginning at 8 p.m. every night since late April, tens of thousands of […]