Tag Archives: indigenous

The Oka Crisis- Critical Analysis

Critical Analysis: The Oka Crisis The Oka Crisis of 1990 resulted from the enduring racist ideological foundation of the Canadian state that grants it utmost authority in governing Indigenous land and to deny to Indigenous populations the right to self-determination (Gordon, 2006, p. 34). The following analysis reveals the power relations behind the Oka Crisis […]

Elsipogtog: An Analysis of the Anti-Fracking Protest

The Elsipogtog First Nation anti-fracking protest of 2013 has left an undeniable, eye-opening impact on Canadians which allowed them to see current issues faced by Indigenous communities across the country. The unjust events that took place during the months of the protest, such as the violent raid by the RCMP, are prime examples of how […]

Elsipogtog: An Overview of the Anti-Fracking Protest

 In June of 2013, First Nation members of Elsipogtog, New Brunswick, began their protest against hydraulic fracturing of shale gas, otherwise known as fracking. Mi’kmaq protestors stood strong and continued to fight for their land through the summer months by creating a blockade on a highway near the development site. On October 17, 2013, RCMP […]

Oka Crisis – 1990

Case Study Overview: The Oka Crisis The Oka Crisis is a renowned land dispute between the Mohawk First Nations and the municipality of Oka, located outside of what is now known as Montreal, Quebec. While the incident involved Akwesasne, Kahnewake, and Kanesetake First Nations, the conflict was primarily situated within the contested borders of the […]

THE IPPERWASH CRISIS: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF THE CANADIAN STATE, SOVEREIGNTY, AND INDIGENOUS DISSENT

In September 1995, indigenous residents of Stoney Point First Nation occupied Ipperwash Provincial Park to protest the extensive appropriation of Stoney Point Reserve by the federal government and their subsequent dispossession (The Ipperwash Inquiry, 2007: 16). Using Ipperwash as a case study of contemporary colonialism, this critical analysis will examine how “Canada [continues to be] […]

Ipperwash: the Violent, Indigenous Rebel Terrorists

As previously discussed, the Ipperwash crisis was a fatal Indigenous land claims protest against the Canadian government in September of 1995 (Morden, 2013). Throughout the duration of the protests at Ipperwash Provincial Park, various media outlets covered the events and the proceedings between the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) and indigenous dissenters. Focusing on five newspaper […]

Gustafsen Lake: Rebels and Dancers

The media coverage over the Gustafsen Lake standoff represents the paternalistic, dismissive attitude the Canadian government and police have of First Nations people. In analyzing media coverage of the Gustafsen Lake Standoff key dominate narratives include the government’s use of National Chief Ovide Mercredi to provide a disingenuous divide between First Nations people of Canada, […]

The Ipperwash Crisis: How the News Media Portrayed It

The Ipperwash Crisis received extensive news media coverage as several different news agencies began to report and record what was occurring at the occupation of Ipperwash Provincial Park on a daily basis. However, it should be noted that while the notion of “reporting” by these news agenics evokes an idea of objectivity and the neutral […]

Media Representations of The Burnt Church Crisis

News coverage of the Burnt Church Crisis exposed deep fissures between Canada’s Indigenous peoples and the mainstream media. In late 1999, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the Mi’kmaq community of New Brunswick was entitled, as per their treaty rights, to hunt and fish without a licence and out of season in pursuit of […]

Ipperwash: An Indigenous Resistance

As an important piece of Canadian and Indigenous history, the Ipperwash crisis was a fatal Indigenous land claims protest against the Canadian government in 1995 (Morden, 2013). The origins of the conflict at Ipperwash are deeply rooted in past socio-historical relations between the Canadian state and Indigenous people throughout the twentieth century (Morden, 2013, p. […]