Tag Archives: indigenous

THE IPPERWASH CRISIS: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF THE CANADIAN STATE, SOVEREIGNTY, AND INDIGENOUS DISSENT

In September 1995, indigenous residents of Stoney Point First Nation occupied Ipperwash Provincial Park to protest the extensive appropriation of Stoney Point Reserve by the federal government and their subsequent dispossession (The Ipperwash Inquiry, 2007: 16). Using Ipperwash as a case study of contemporary colonialism, this critical analysis will examine how “Canada [continues to be] […]

Ipperwash: the Violent, Indigenous Rebel Terrorists

As previously discussed, the Ipperwash crisis was a fatal Indigenous land claims protest against the Canadian government in September of 1995 (Morden, 2013). Throughout the duration of the protests at Ipperwash Provincial Park, various media outlets covered the events and the proceedings between the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) and indigenous dissenters. Focusing on five newspaper […]

Gustafsen Lake: Rebels and Dancers

The media coverage over the Gustafsen Lake standoff represents the paternalistic, dismissive attitude the Canadian government and police have of First Nations people. In analyzing media coverage of the Gustafsen Lake Standoff key dominate narratives include the government’s use of National Chief Ovide Mercredi to provide a disingenuous divide between First Nations people of Canada, […]

The Ipperwash Crisis: How the News Media Portrayed It

The Ipperwash Crisis received extensive news media coverage as several different news agencies began to report and record what was occurring at the occupation of Ipperwash Provincial Park on a daily basis. However, it should be noted that while the notion of “reporting” by these news agenics evokes an idea of objectivity and the neutral […]

Media Representations of The Burnt Church Crisis

News coverage of the Burnt Church Crisis exposed deep fissures between Canada’s Indigenous peoples and the mainstream media. In late 1999, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the Mi’kmaq community of New Brunswick was entitled, as per their treaty rights, to hunt and fish without a licence and out of season in pursuit of […]

Ipperwash: An Indigenous Resistance

As an important piece of Canadian and Indigenous history, the Ipperwash crisis was a fatal Indigenous land claims protest against the Canadian government in 1995 (Morden, 2013). The origins of the conflict at Ipperwash are deeply rooted in past socio-historical relations between the Canadian state and Indigenous people throughout the twentieth century (Morden, 2013, p. […]

The Ipperwash Crisis: An Overview

In 1942, the Stony Point First Nation’s reserve was expropriated by the federal government for the use of a military camp (Morden, 2013). In years to follow, the tension between the federal government and those who were forced to relocate grew and despite multiple promises to return the land, the government failed to do so. […]

The Burnt Church Crisis

The Burnt Church Crisis was a conflict in New Brunswick, Canada, from 1999-2002, between the Mi’kmaq community of Burnt Church and the non-Native residents of New Brunswick. The underlying cause of the dispute between the Mi’kmaq people and the non-Natives was the disagreement of fishing rights in the Miramichi Bay. The Mi’kmaq community claimed that they […]

Shutting down pipeline and oilsands opposition: National Energy Board, CSIS and RCMP surveillance

Harper government’s extensive spying on anti-oilsands groups revealed in FOIs Matthew Millar, November 17, 2013 in Vancouver Observer http://www.vancouverobserver.com/politics/harper-governments-extensive-spying-anti-oilsands-groups-revealed-fois CSIS, RCMP monitored activist groups before Northern Gateway hearings Shawn McCarthy, November 24, 2013 in The Globe and Mail http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/industry-news/energy-and-resources/csis-rcmp-monitored-activists-for-risk-before-enbridge-hearings/article15555935/ Canadian spies met with energy firms, documents reveal Martin Lukacs and Tim Groves, October 2013 in […]

Elsipogtog: Showing us something about the social, political & economic relations of the Canadian state

In the early morning of Thursday October 17, over 100 RCMP officers moved in on land protectors camped out at Elsipogtog, there to prevent fracking by SWN Resources. This included  camouflaged tactical officers armed with assault rifles, and with dogs. 40 people were arrested. For a firsthand account of events on October 17, see this […]