Tag Archives: police brutality

Anti-Police Brutality: A Critical Analysis

State and police exercising power in society is nothing new, nor is public resistance to this type of power, but those resisting this power have recently become much more critical of state and police affairs. From displays of sovereign power, to modern undertakings of disciplinary power to help regulate individuals, there appears to be at […]

Ready For Riots: Police Anti-Brutalization Protesters Have The Media On Their Side

The media has not only taken on the role of constructing police brutalization as imminent, particularly for minorities, but they also characterize the police as predatory. The death of Cleveland native Tamir Rice has been billed an attack against an innocent Black youth playing with a toy gun (Lopez, 2014), and the death of Eric […]

Clash of Clans: The Uprising of Police Brutality and Citizens’ Response

Organized in 1995, the Collective Opposed to Police Brutality (C.O.B.P., following their French acronym) is a group dedicated to the rights of those affected by police brutality. The group is still active today, organizing The International Day Against Police Brutality, which takes place every March 15, and has spread across the world. The group does […]

Ipperwash: An Indigenous Resistance

As an important piece of Canadian and Indigenous history, the Ipperwash crisis was a fatal Indigenous land claims protest against the Canadian government in 1995 (Morden, 2013). The origins of the conflict at Ipperwash are deeply rooted in past socio-historical relations between the Canadian state and Indigenous people throughout the twentieth century (Morden, 2013, p. […]

The Gastown Riot, 1971

The Gastown Riot, also known as ‘smoke-in’ and Street Jamboree, occurred on August 7, 1971 in ‘Maple Tree Square’, a popular location in Gastown, Vancouver. The ‘smoke-in’ gathering at Maple Tree Square was to be a peaceful protest involving the Youth International Party (Yippies) along with other youth living in the Gastown area. Two individuals […]

The Burnt Church Crisis

The Burnt Church Crisis was a conflict in New Brunswick, Canada, from 1999-2002, between the Mi’kmaq community of Burnt Church and the non-Native residents of New Brunswick. The underlying cause of the dispute between the Mi’kmaq people and the non-Natives was the disagreement of fishing rights in the Miramichi Bay. The Mi’kmaq community claimed that they […]

Regulation 233/10: More than a Security Measure!

The G20 Summit protests will be remembered for two things; one being the implementation of Regulation 233/10 and subsequently from that, the event responsible for the largest mass arrest in Canadian history. Former Premier McGunity and Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair have exhausted the excuse of “need for security” during the G20 as the rationale […]

Bias Representation of G20 in the Media

Whenever there is a social movement or a protest, there is always a representation of it in the media. The representation of an event in the media is not by a coincidence; there is usually a certain perspective of the event that is meant to be conveyed to the public by the media. In the […]

Toronto G-20 Summit Protests: Confusion, Secrecy and the Media

Do you remember when you were a child and a game called broken telephone was played? It involved passing a message from person to person really fast, by the time the last person received the message it was a remade and distorted version of the original message. The game created confusion and left the entire […]

G20 Policing: State organized violence

G20 stands for Group of Twenty Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors from 20 economies (G2012 Mexico 2012). In 1999, G20 was established to examine key issues in the global economy to bring together important industrialized and developing economies (G2012 Mexico 2012).G20 encourages open discussion on key issues related to global economic stability between industrial and emerging-market […]