Tag Archives: protest

The Ipperwash Crisis: An Analysis

It is undeniable that the outcome of the Ipperwash crisis was none less than devastating. The death of Dudley George and the actions of the police towards the protestors as a group allows for the issue of criminalizing dissent to be brought to light, and hopefully eventually addressed at the institutional level. The Ipperwash crisis […]

Mass Media’s Hidden Agenda in the Coverage of Summit of the Americas

It is worth acknowledging that ordinary citizens get the vast majority of their conventional news from mass media. Whether it’s true or not, the citizen’s dependence on mass media does not decline and leads them to believe the stories that are reported as substantially viable. Four of the six news articles, from across Canada, used […]

Media Analysis of The Ipperwash Crisis, 1995

The history of colonialism is one that remains embedded institutionally and is seen in present norms and ideologies. It is not surprising then, that media representations work to reinforce these ideas by reporting through a biased lens, working to legitimatize unjust actions against those deemed to be the problem. The Ipperwash crisis can serve as […]

How the Media Framed Take Back the Night, Vancouver, 2013

The media is the main source of information regarding numerous events in society, thus shaping our understandings and opinions on a continual basis. Without the extensive coverage of the news, many events would be left invisible to the general public. That being said, it is crucial to always remain critical of the messages being portrayed. […]

Idle No More: Chief Theresa Spence’s Hunger Strike

Theresa Spence is the chief of the First Nations community, Attawapiskat. On December 12, 2012, Chief Theresa Spence commenced her hunger strike; taking place camped on an island in the Ottawa River near the Parliament. The ongoing hunger strike sought recognition from the Canadian government especially as Chief Spence was seeking to have a discussion […]

Take Back the Night: An Overview

For years, women in society have been given rules to abide by, and are reprimanded if they do not follow them. Some of these rules include: dressing respectably; and avoiding unsafe areas at night, unless in the presence of a male. In response to these unwritten rules, a group of European women came together in […]

The Ipperwash Crisis: An Overview

In 1942, the Stony Point First Nation’s reserve was expropriated by the federal government for the use of a military camp (Morden, 2013). In years to follow, the tension between the federal government and those who were forced to relocate grew and despite multiple promises to return the land, the government failed to do so. […]

Kanehsatà:ke (Oka), 23 years later…

On the 23rd anniversary of the “Oka Crisis”, a rally was held at Oka Park to remember the events of 1990, but also to protest the incursion of Enbridge representatives  to inspect a pipeline — which included drilling into the ground — running through the territory, as part of plans to reverse the flow of […]

Critical Analysis: Kingston Penitentiary Riot 1971

The Kingston Penitentiary Riot of 1971 is a significant event for understanding the criminalization of dissent. The criminalization of dissent illustrates the wider social, political and economic issues in the Canadian state. There are a number of key theoretical and conceptual frameworks relevant to the Kingston Penitentiary Riot, including power dynamics and class struggles, the […]

Women’s Suffrage: The Difference between Prosecution and Persecution

Women suffragette’s organized themselves and protested against inequality and their lack of rights for a span of decades between the late 19th century and early 20th century.  During this time in Canada, patriarchy was deeply embedded in the social, economic and political fabric of the nation and many women were ready for a change.  The […]